Seed Swap: The More Risks

What do you think about kids and risks? It's quite the topic these days. Personally, I am all for it. Click through to learn more and get great resources for helping children navigate risk.

What do you think about kids and risks? It’s quite the topic these days. Personally, I am all for it.

After years of teaching, aunting, and befriending children and parents, I am very positive about the outcomes that pro risk parenting brings.

From social, academic, and physical confidence and resiliency to improved body awareness, a good set of risk benefit analysis skills serves children very very well.

 

Not to mention, we all grew up taking huge risks as did our parents and grandparents, and we are all doing pretty well I’d say!

I’m not saying put your children and students in danger. NO WAY. I’m saying let them learn by doing. And if that results in a skinned knee, well that never really hurt anyone.

The lessons learned from risks in the long run are far more valuable than the torn tights or tears shed in the short term.

If parents and teachers do their jobs well, the children in their care will grow to be happy, healthy, creative, resilient, independent adults. Teaching risk analysis in childhood is a key factor in the development of this type of adult.

So next time you’re on the playground, let them climb to the top of the monkey bars, and then on your next nature adventure let them climb the tree. Continue to let the risks grow with the child in developmentally appropriate ways and watch the child flourish.

Share your ideas and experiences with risk in childhood in the comments below!

Seeds to Sprout:

Read the Definitive book on the importance, developmentally, of teaching risk benefit analysis in childhood. Wild Play: Parenting Adventures in the Great Outdoors by David Sobel. I like it so much I even wrote a blog pots on it. Check it out!

Read this Guardian article on why risk is essential in childhood here.

Learn more about the role of risk in children’s play and learning in this Community Playthings article here.

 

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